continuo-docs:

Barbara RoseNot Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel, 4-pages essay published by Galleria Schwarz, Milan, Italy, 1971

This is a reprint of Barbara Rose’s legendary essay – originally published in Source: Music of the Avantgarde, issue #7, USA, 1970– on John Cage’s set of four Plexigrams and one lithograph titled Not Wanting to Say Anything about Marcel, created via chance operations in 1969. The essay was an instant classic and is here provided along Italian and French translations. The latter version is simply a joy to read thanks to Denise Madin-Gentili’s superb translation.

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N.H. Pritchard - New Jazz Poets (1967)

text-mode:

Henri Chopin‘s sound poetry released in 1987 by Jacques Donguy.

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continuo-docs:

An Exhibition of World Graphic Scores, Minami Gallery, Tokyo, 1962

This exhibition included international artists, especially from the U.S. Fluxus branch, as well as graphic scores by members of the Jikken kōbō 実験工房, or Experimental Workshop –see previous post,– like Toshi Ichiyanagi, Yuji Takahashi, Toru Takemitsu, Joji (George) Yuasa, Yasunao Tone, among others.

Source: The Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Archives, the Museum of Modern Art, New York (link).

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visual-poetry:

"film" by ernst jandl
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rudygodinez:

Takehisa Kosugi, Film and Film #4, (1965)
 Surprisingly little has been written about this Kosugi performance that was apparently so influential in its time. An article Jonathan Walley wrote for October describes the work as follows: “In [Film and Film #4], Kosugi made rectangular cuts of increasing size from a paper screen lit by the beam of an empty 16mm projector (starting with a small cut at the center of the screen and working his way out until there was, in effect, no screen left, and the projector’s beam hit the rear wall of the space). Though it employed no celluloid, Film and Film #4 makes very clear references to the material conditions of filmmaking. Its alternations of white (the screen, the beam of light) and black (the darkened space, the growing hole in the screen), which Kosugi extended to the clothing he wore during the performance, invoke black-and-white photography, and positive and negative imagery. The alterations made to the screen suggest such filmic elements as framing, zooming, cutting (of course), and change over time.” 
 (via)

rudygodinez:

Takehisa Kosugi, Film and Film #4, (1965)

 Surprisingly little has been written about this Kosugi performance that was apparently so influential in its time. An article Jonathan Walley wrote for October describes the work as follows: “In [Film and Film #4], Kosugi made rectangular cuts of increasing size from a paper screen lit by the beam of an empty 16mm projector (starting with a small cut at the center of the screen and working his way out until there was, in effect, no screen left, and the projector’s beam hit the rear wall of the space). Though it employed no celluloid, Film and Film #4 makes very clear references to the material conditions of filmmaking. Its alternations of white (the screen, the beam of light) and black (the darkened space, the growing hole in the screen), which Kosugi extended to the clothing he wore during the performance, invoke black-and-white photography, and positive and negative imagery. The alterations made to the screen suggest such filmic elements as framing, zooming, cutting (of course), and change over time.” 

 (via)

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grupaok:

Eccentric Abstraction, curated by Lucy Lippard at the Fischbach Gallery, 1968

grupaok:

Eccentric Abstraction, curated by Lucy Lippard at the Fischbach Gallery, 1968

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merzbow-derek:

1971 | HAPAX LEGOMENA III: CRITICAL MASS | Hollis Frampton

(Source: filmandimage)

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John Latham Burnt Book Artist